LINCOLN ZEPHYR

JAGUAR XK120
January 3, 2014
ROLLS ROYCE COUPE
January 4, 2014

Mega Engineering Vehicle will deliver your LINCOLN ZEPHYR 1939 SERIES 96H  to you anywhere around the World through our affiliates.
Experience the true Classic LINCOLN ZEPHYR 1939 SERIES 96H.

LINCOLN ZEPHYR

Price upon request

LINCOLN ZEPHYR COUPE SERIES 96H 1939

Styling was done by John Tjaarda and Eugene Gregory. Incorporated into the front, was a long horizontal hood, headlamps intergrated into the fenders and a grille with horizontal bars. The roof line sloped back to the rear bumper and designed into the rear of the vehicle were fender skirts.
The construction of the Zephyr was made up of a stiffer than body-on-frame unit. Powered by a V12 engine, the 3,350 pound vehicle could reach 90 miles per hour.
The Zephyr was powered by a small 75° V12 engine[2] developed from Ford’s Flathead V8
The 1936 to 1939 models were 267 in³ (4.4 L) with hydraulic lifters added in 1938
The original engine had 110 hp (82 kW) and gave the car a top speed of 90 miles per hour (140 km/h). Suspension was by Henry Ford’s beloved transverse springs front and rear, with dead axle front and torque tube rear, already seen as outdated when the car was introduced. Brakes were cable-activated for 1936 to 1938; 1939 and onward were hydraulic.
This Lincoln Zephyr is one of only three hundred and two convertible sedans produced in 1939. It was acquired by its present owners about a quarter of a century ago. A restoration soon followed. The banana yellow paint was stripped, revealing its original color – a special shade of Ardmore Green, which was introduced in and available only for 1939. All colors throughout are original to the car, style and year. This Convertible Sedan is also fitted with nearly every available option and accessory.
When the restoration was completed, the car was shown only once, at the Orange County regional meet of the Lincoln-Zephyr Owners Club in 2008, where it scored 98.75 points. There, it was awarded First in Class and the Ford Trophy, and it went on to be displayed at the Petersen Automotive Museum.

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